Thoracic Instructions

All chest cases require acceptance of histologic or culture proof. Exceptions must be cleared by Dr. Galvin (see below). Cases should be accompanied by chest radiographs whenever possible. CT cases should have both mediastinal and lung windows. Any well-correlated case will be accepted. However, the following subject areas are of particular interest:

  • High‐resolution thin‐section CT of diffuse lung disease — gross specimens are helpful but not critical. There must be, however, an open lung or transbronchial biopsy. A combination of thick and thin sections is optimal. Coronal reconstruction to demonstrate the distribution is also helpful.
  • Diffuse lung disease treated with lung transplantation — if properly prepared, these cases allow gross photography of the sectioned lung. Imaging from multiple points in time is important to illustrate the natural course of disease.
  • Tuberculosis
  • Drug-Induced Pulmonary Disease
  • Infectious Pulmonary Disease
  • AIDS-Related Thoracic Disease
  • Pulmonary Manifestations of Systemic Disease
  • Granulomatous Pulmonary Disease
  • Airways Disease
  • Inhalational Lung Disease — to best correlate pathologic material with chest radiographic studies, please work with your pathologist before the pulmonary tissue is resected to arrange for inflated and fixed lung specimens. A variety of techniques are nicely detailed in Dr. E.R. Heitzman's book, The Lung, 2nd edition, St. Louis: CV Mosby, 1984 (pp. 412). Macrosections as well as microsections of the inflated fixed tissue would significantly improve the radiologic/pathology correlation. Inflated whole lung (or lobar/segmental) specimen radiographs of any pulmonary case would be greatly appreciated.

Faculty contact: Dr. Jeffrey Galvin (jgalvin@acr.org)

Neuroradiology Categorical Course

August 6-9, 2018

This course will identify imaging characteristics of lesions involving the brain, spine, head and neck that allow for narrowing of the differential diagnosis, along with illustrating how the underlying pathology of the lesion contributes to its imaging characteristics.

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